Home > Uncategorized > The One About The Blankets and Quentin Tarantino Speaking Japanese

The One About The Blankets and Quentin Tarantino Speaking Japanese

Today was again the sort of day that makes one say “Let’s go to Wal-Mart and buy more blankets” before going to Wal-Mart to buy more blankets. We’re all nestled on the couch now, warm as mice near a toaster. Well, Danielle is currently nestled under a pile of blankets on the couch playing Dragon Age: Origins, I’m currently shivering in front of the computer.

We’re both quite comfortable, though. The many e-mails and phonecalls voicing concern about blizzards and frost and being buried under a thick slate of ice are very nice, but there needn’t be any more of them. We’re fine, really.

For those wondering:

Be careful with those chopsticks, kids.

These are quite old, having been around for at least a decade now, but I still love quoting them from time to time.

Found here, most recently, they’re Kurt Vonnegut’s 8 Rules for Writing Fiction.

And they are as follows:

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. Now matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

– Vonnegut, Kurt Vonnegut, Bagombo Snuff Box: Uncollected Short Fiction (New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons 1999), 9-10.

Very useful information there.

If you are able to translate, from Japanese to English, the dialogue in the following advertisement featuring Quentin Tarantino, please do so in the comments section.

If you are unable to translate, please just watch and enjoy a wonderfully bizarre thing:

Amanda Palmer decided to frighten (er, brighten) the day lights out of some people in New York by walking around and lip synching to “Hell” by Tegan and Sara.

Right. Feet are nearly frozen, will retreat to warmth of blanket and snuggley type woman creature underneath it.

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